Bee house in hexagonal honeycomb shape with wood shingle facade

Bee-Family, the Swiss bee conservation project, has been given a new landmark feature for its location in Frasnacht on Lake Constance: an extraordinary bee house made entirely of timber. We were in charge of its design, planning and implementation.

The honeycomb-shaped bee house is 7 m long, 4 m high and deep and stands on four rollers. It houses eight bee colonies and a honey super. The individual timber elements in honeycomb form are connected to each other in a hexagon. The specially made wood shingles of the facade and the entrances for the bees also reflect the hexagonal honeycomb shape.

It took about four weeks to build this charming bee house in our factory.

Project details

Client:
Bee Family AG
Architecture:
Blumer-Lehmann AG
Project type:
Commercial and industrial
Construction type:
Wood element construction
Services:
Timber construction
Construction:
2021
Locality:
Frasnacht, Switzerland
The Bee-Family bee house at its location in Frasnacht on Lake Constance.

Honeycomb-shaped bee house with its facade of hexagonal wood shingles nestled in a flowering meadow.

Entrance to the all-timber bee house from close up

The Bee-Family bee house was made in our factory and then transported to Frasnacht.

Full view of the bee house in the garden with trees and shrubs

The timber for the charming Bee-Family bee house comes from Lehmann Holzwerk.

Interior of the Bee-Family bee house with honey super and bee colonies

Bild 5 Legende The interior of the bee house, with spaces for the bee colonies and a honey super, is also made entirely of timber.

Detailed view of the wooden entrance door and facade with honeycomb wood shingles

The specially made wood shingles in honeycomb form in focus.

Close-up of the wooden facade and bee entrances of the bee house

Eight bee colonies find room to live in the new timber bee house.

Front view of the bee house with entrance door

The bee house with its special honeycomb shape is the new landmark feature of the Bee-Family conservation project.

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